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1- Faculty of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
2- Department of Critical Care, Children Growth Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran , victoria_che@yahoo.com
3- Clinical Research Development Unit, Qods Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
4- Children Growth Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
Abstract:   (145 Views)
Introduction: Subglottic stenosis is one of the most common airway problems in children, which is both acquired and congenital. More than 90% of acquired cases are secondary to endotracheal intubation and occur iatrogenic ally. Subglottic stenosis is an unexpected problem that requires timely diagnosis and intervention. Most cases of subglottic stenosis in children are mild to moderate.
Case Report: The patient is a 10-year-old child who, after a long intubation due to head trauma following early discharge from the surgical center, is referred to the Children's Hospital on the same day with a complaint of high fever and shortness of breath. With the development of respiratory distress and cyanosis, the patient is transferred to the intensive care unit and Due to the impossibility of passing the tracheal tube with the appropriate age for the patient, the initial diagnosis of subglottic stenosis is made and a tracheostomy is performed. Diagnostic bronchoscopy confirmed severe subglottic stenosis, and the child was referred to a specialized ENT center for repair of the tracheal stenosis.
Conclusion: One of the most common causes of stridor in children is subglottic stenosis following prolonged intubation. Knowing the predisposing factors, prevention, strong clinical suspicion, timely diagnosis and treatment can prevent further adverse complications or consequences in children
     
Type of Study: case report | Subject: Pediatrics

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