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1- 1. Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
2- 1. Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran. , fatemeh2022x@gmail.com
Abstract:   (75 Views)
Background: The preterm birth (PB) is a worldwide gestational problem. Poor sleep quality and short duration have been reported as the possible predisposing factors of PB in some of the studies.
Objective: The aim of this study was investigating the roles of sleep quality/duration in occurrence of PB
Methods: This longitudinal study was performed on pregnant women with gestational age ≤14 weeks. The sleep quality was evaluated using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in the first visit and women were followed until delivery. Two groups of women with preterm (n=76) and term delivery  (n=441) were compared regarding the sleep quality components, sleep duration, and long or short sleep duration. The multivariate logistic regression was run for examining the independent association of sleep quality/duration with PB.
Results: In total, data of 517 participants were analyzed. The PB occurred in 14.7% of participants. There was no significant difference of 7 items of sleep quality between preterm and non-preterm groups (P>0.05 for each comparison). Total PSQI score was borderline significantly higher (poorer quality) in preterm group compared to non- preterm one (5.6±2.1 vs 5.3±2.4, P=0.076). In multivariate logistic regression each unit of worsening PSQI was independently associated with a 20% higher risk of PB occurrence. Duration of sleep was not associated with PB either in unadjusted or adjusted models.
Conclusion: There is no association between poor sleep quality (defined as PSQI>5) and PB, however, based on our results  poorer sleep quality (as a continuous variable) can be an independent risk factor of PB.
     
Type of Study: Research | Subject: Obsterics & Gynecology

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